1

I have this sentence:

By inserting HTML tags into a page of text and other content, you mark which part of the page is what to provide structure to the document.

By inserting HTML tags into a page of text and other content is the adverb of manner ,in the last part of the sentence, you mark which part of the page is what to provide structure to the document.

My questions are:

  1. Is you mark which part of the page the subject?
  2. How to understand the what in what to provide structure to the document?
2

There's nothing wrong grammatically. The which is what (or what's what) construction is an idiomatic form generally used when associating a list of things with a list of names or purposes. Consider a bunch of bicycle parts laying on a table. One might announce, "Here's all the parts you need." To which your friend might ask, "Yes, but which is what?" Meaning, "Please tell me the name or purpose of each of these parts because I don't know what they are or where they go."

Likewise in your sentence, there are a bunch of parts to the HTML document and the HTML tags provides the means of identifying what each part of the page is and thus provide structure to the document- E.g., here's the document header, here's the body, here's some divs, here's a title, etc.

The subject of your sentence is you and the verb is mark.

  • is which part of the page is what to provide structure to the document a object clause? – it_is_a_literature Jan 1 '14 at 8:54
  • which part of the page is what is the object clause. to provide structure to the document modifies the verb mark – Jim Jan 1 '14 at 8:59
0

I agree with Jim. I answer the question to provide a clearer parsing.

(By inserting HTML tags into a page of text and other content), you mark (which part of the page is what) (to provide structure to the document).

It might be easier to understand it like this:

  • You mark [which part of the page] is what.
  • You mark so by inserting HTML tags into a page of text and other content.
  • You mark so to provide structure to the document.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.