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I want to write something imaginary like

I am happy for the positive results as if I really helped in the treatment.

In fact, I am really happy, but I didn’t help in the treatment. Which one is the correct one?

  1. l am happy for the positive results as if I really helped in the treatment.
  2. I am happy for the positive results as if I really had helped in the treatment.
  3. I am happy for the positive results as if I really have helped in the treatment.
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    4. I am as happy about the positive results as if I really had helped with the treatment. Dec 27, 2017 at 22:49
  • What if I write this instead, I felt great as if I really had helped in this treatment?
    – Amal Hope
    Dec 27, 2017 at 23:02
  • There needs to be some punctuation between 'great' and 'as if'. Dec 27, 2017 at 23:17
  • Ok let me write down the sentence, “I felt great when I saw the doctors reactions, as if I had personally helped in the treatment.” What do you think? Is it grammatically correct?
    – Amal Hope
    Dec 27, 2017 at 23:30
  • I'd use a dash (or a full stop followed by a fragment in informal writing), and doctors needs an apostrophe. Dec 27, 2017 at 23:47

1 Answer 1

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An "as if" clause is a perfect example of a contrary-to-fact statement that should be in the subjunctive. Since the imaginary event would have happened in the past, the tense looks like the past perfect, but is actually the past subjunctive. I would also suggest a couple of stylistic changes:

I am as happy about the results as if I had personally helped with the treatment.

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  • What if write, I felt great as if I had personally helped in the treatment. Is it correct?
    – Amal Hope
    Dec 27, 2017 at 23:11
  • Again, I would say "as great as if..." but yes, it's correct.
    – KarlG
    Dec 27, 2017 at 23:13

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