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'"You told me to bring cannon-shot next time, an' I've brought 'em."

'He saw we had. He ripped out a fathom and a half o' brimstone Spanish, and he swung down on our rail, and he kissed me before all his fine young captains. His men was swarming out of the lower ports ready to unload us. When he saw how I'd considered all his likely wants, he kissed me again.

This is from "Simple Simon" in "Rewards and Fairies" by Kipling.

I do not understand the meaning of this.

He ripped out a fathom and a half o' brimstone Spanish

This is from the note of Kipling Society.
[Page 300, line 4] brimstone Spanish Brimstone is sulphur. In this context, 'fiery', or 'burning'. The reader can assume that Drake was swearing exuberantly in Spanish.

I am so glad if somebody kindly teach me.

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    I think you answered your own question. The notes on this suggest Kipling is using a very colorful metaphor to say that Drake is swearing, in a fiery and excited way, in Spanish. – Andrew Dec 29 '17 at 3:00
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"He ripped out a fathom and a half o' brimstone Spanish"

'ripped out' is an idiom meaning to tear something out of something else.

'a fathom and a half' is a way of measurement. 1 fathom ~ 1.82 meters.

o' is short form for 'of', you may have already known that.

I am not sure about brimstone Spanish, its blank meaning is azufre or sulfur which is a substance. It could be something else.

So, this sentence can be translated into

"He torn out a piece of azufre which is about 2.7 meters long and he swung down on our rail"

This is just my personal opinion but i hope it helps :)

  • The note says "The reader can assume that Drake was swearing exuberantly in Spanish." Why do you think this means "he ripped out 2 meters of azufre"? Ripped it out of where? – ColleenV parted ways Dec 30 '17 at 3:57

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