2

I am describing how this part of my code works:

def store_output(self, file_name, identifier):
    dsc_in = ogr.Open(file_name)
    if dsc_in is None:
        raise Exception("Reading data failed.")
    dsc_out = ogr.Open("PG:" + self.connstr)
    if dsc_out is None:
        raise Exception("Database connection has not been established.")
    layer = dsc_out.CopyLayer(dsc_in.GetLayer(), identifier,
                              ['OVERWRITE=YES',
                               'SCHEMA={}'.format(self.schema_name))
    if layer is None:
        raise Exception("Writing output data to the database failed.")

I now want to describe the "if layer is None:" parts, and I am missing a word (or a couple of words):

"Each of the three above mentioned operations is followed by a simple ______________ that checks if the output of the operation is not None."

I thought about "statement", but I feel like that's not exactly what it is.

8
  • 5
    I would probably say "exception handler," but I feel like this is more of a technical question than an English one.
    – J.R.
    Commented Dec 29, 2017 at 16:19
  • You have to assess your audience/context and decide whether a technical term or an informality such as "bit of code" is appropriate. You could say, for example, "conditional test that raises an exception when applicable"
    – TimR
    Commented Dec 29, 2017 at 16:48
  • 1
    In plain English, the "if layer is None" line is a test. You're looking at a simple test that checks whether the output of .CopyLayer is None. Commented Dec 29, 2017 at 16:49
  • I would never use "bit" in its informal sense to describe computer code because there is a quite different technical sense used in computer science. I like the "simple test" suggested in the last comment. Alternatively, "short procedure" works. Commented Dec 29, 2017 at 16:56
  • 1
    Or, shorter, "... followed by a simple test if the output ..."
    – Mr Lister
    Commented Dec 29, 2017 at 17:33

7 Answers 7

2
// --------------------------
    dsc_in = ogr.Open(...)    // A statement that evaluates an expression (the method) and then assigns its result to a variable.
    if dsc_in is None:        // A conditional statement that evaluates an expression.
        raise Exception()     // A statement.
// --------------------------
    dsc_out = ogr.Open(...)   // Same pattern as above...
    if dsc_out is None:
        raise Exception()
// --------------------------
    layer = dsc_out.Copy(...) // Same pattern as above...
    if layer is None:
        raise Exception()

Each of the three abovementioned operations is followed by a simple _____ that checks if the output of the operation is different from None."

Some general terms:

  • Statement - Basically any "line" of code. Line is in quotes because you can technically have a statement span multiple lines.
  • Expression - Something that is evaluated to produce a value. This could be a method call, such as in the above code snippet, or even something like "1 + 1".
  • Operation - A mathematical or binary action. (+, -, *, /, |, &, etc)

If I could suggest a description of this code snippet, I would say:

Each of the three aforementioned assignment statements is followed by a test to see whether the assigned value is "none", and if so, an exception is raised.

5

I would say something like code block, piece of code, or a more specific description of the statement(s). That is, since "if layer is None" is an if statement, I might say "followed by a simple if statement..." with the implied context that I am referring to the entirety of the conditional and the code within it.

2
  • 1
    Agreed. It's an "if statement", common programming jargon.
    – Andrew
    Commented Dec 29, 2017 at 16:53
  • Yes, I'd say code block, block of code, or just block. It's a lot easier discover the usual term if you work with a language that uses something like {} to delimit blocks of code :-)
    – jamesqf
    Commented Dec 30, 2017 at 5:43
3

The part that "checks" is called a (boolean) condition:

In computer science, conditional statements, conditional expressions and conditional constructs are features of a programming language, which perform different computations or actions depending on whether a programmer-specified boolean condition evaluates to true or false. - wikipedia (emphasis, mine)

3
  • Technically true, but I think the OP is asking for a term to describe the block of code that's executed if the result of logical if statement is true.
    – jamesqf
    Commented Dec 30, 2017 at 5:41
  • Technically, the condition is (blah) is None, and the whole if-then-else chunk is the conditional statement (or just conditional for short).
    – Hellion
    Commented Dec 30, 2017 at 6:03
  • @jamesqf Actually, the OP was interested in "a simple ___ that checks if the output ... is different from None" (emphasis, mine). The part that gets executed if the statement is true isn't the check itself.
    – Lawrence
    Commented Dec 30, 2017 at 6:05
2

Consider also guard, a word for a conditional that emphasizes that some code must be prevented from executing if a condition is not met.

1

I, as someone who's a native English speaker and has been programming professionally for decades, would say... "bit of code" to fill the blank in "Each of the three above mentioned operations is followed by a simple ______________ that checks if the output of the operation is different from None."

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  • Please read the body of the question and not just the title.
    – user64742
    Commented Dec 30, 2017 at 8:00
  • @Typhon the phrase "bit of code" is what I'd use to fill in the blank.
    – RonJohn
    Commented Dec 30, 2017 at 14:39
  • alright fair enough, but they are asking for the formal technical term and not just any way to refer to it with English.
    – user64742
    Commented Dec 30, 2017 at 21:07
  • @Typhon I don't see any reference in the Q to a request for a technical term.
    – RonJohn
    Commented Dec 30, 2017 at 21:41
  • "I feel like that's not exactly what it is." (emphasis mine). Clearly a bit of code is considered not specific enough for them, hence they are looking for the technical term. Furthermore they used the tag terminology meaning that they want a technical term.
    – user64742
    Commented Dec 30, 2017 at 23:18
1

Unfortunately you are overthinking it and should rely on the laziness of programmers:

Each of the three above mentioned operations is followed by a simple check that the output of the operation is not None.

For the code you posted, this is a very clear description.

In general when you “snip” out a piece of code to look at or use you can call it a “snippet”

0

a short piece of code, as given in this book on programming: short piece of code

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