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The definition below is from the book "Oxford Guide to English Grammar"

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I can't understand why there is no auxiliary after to in the example "I haven't washed up yet, but I'm going to."

But why there is an auxiliary after to in this example "I haven't done as much work today as I'd like to have."

Is that because the first example is split by the word ", but" there?

Then what about this example "Jane was chosen for the job, although she didn't expect to be."

I want to know the grammar rule applied in the above examples.

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You can leave out a lexical verb when it's implicit, but you cannot leave out an auxiliary verb. The two examples you provide wherein the infinitive has to be written out ("be" and "have") are auxiliaries in those two specific situations:

"Jane was chosen for the job, although she didn't expect to be (chosen). (the main verb is "choose" (past participle: chosen); therefore, "to be" is an auxiliary verb.)

"I have not done as much work today as I'd like to have (done)." (the main verb is "do" (past participle: done); therefore, "to have" is an auxiliary verb.)

But, in your example,

"I haven't washed up yet, but I'm going to (wash up)."

the main verb is "wash" (past participle: washed); therefore, it is not an auxiliary verb and, thus, can stand as just "to".

I hope that might have helped you out. Take care and good luck!

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  • You're welcome. Happy New Year to you, too.
    – Nick
    Jan 1, 2018 at 17:10

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