1

I would like to check if my following sentence structure is correct.

You've got to see my enemy's face when I was winning.

or

You got to see my enemy's face when I was winning.

  • Do you mean "enemy" or "opponent"? – Jasper Jan 6 at 17:40
  • If I understand correctly what you are trying to say, you're using the incorrect modal. Recommendation = should. Example: "You should've seen my opponent's face when I won." – Karen927 May 8 at 23:16
0

The OP's sentence: You got to see my enemy's face when I was winning.

Grammatical: Yes but the have got form here specifically would be incorrect for this specific meaning.

Specific idiomatic usage of to get to do something: * I got to go to the sports' event last night [because I had tickets].

* He didn't get to see the movie on TV because he arrived late.

* He got to see his favorite band at the concert last night.

Meaning: to be able to do something when there is something else that could have stopped you from doing it or interfered with your doing it.

Compare the above to: to have to/have got to:

You just have to see that movie. It's great. You've just got to see that movie. It's great.

Caveat; The story of get in English is very complicated. I am only addressing the specific idiomatic usage of to get to do something as possibly confused with to have/have got to do something (meaning: must do something).

The present perfect of get to do something in AmE is: have gotten to do something.

I have not gotten to go out at night recently. [meaning: not been able to]

The present perfect of get to do something in BrE would be: to have got to do something because the Brits do not use gotten anymore.

That said, this idiom is more likely to be expressed in BrE as: to manage to do something. Manage to do something is also used in AmE.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.