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Suppose someone said:

"Why don't we go camping this year?"

Would it be correct to say:

She suggested that we could go camping that summer.

I can't say:

She suggested going camping that summer.

My answer was brought about by unacceptable using of two Gerunds whereas saying "going for a camping" isn't idiomatic according to the research done by me some minutes ago. I am right, aren't I? Or there exist some alternative ways of solving this issue.

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"Why don't we go camping this year?"

Would it be correct to say:

She suggested that we could go camping that summer. ?

Answer: Yes, that is correct.

She suggested going camping that summer.

Answer: Yes, that is also correct.

Go camping is idiomatic, like go sailing or go hunting or go dancing to name a few and it's fine to have two ing endings: going camping. In fact, to make it a noun it has to be: going camping.

Going camping is fun, isn't it?

That is completely idiomatic. Going camping is the phrasal subject there.

Going camping is not two gerunds. Go camping is a verb and a noun, a set phrase (the activity of camping is a noun taken from a gerund, that is very common in English). Going camping functions as subject or direct object and is considered a single thing, made up of one verb and one noun.

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  • Take my apologies for not having read you reply to my post before. As it turned out, I didn't consider it as set phrase made up of a verb and a noun. You did me a favour by writing such an expanded answer. Thank you very much. Jan 8, 2018 at 23:44

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