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Does it make sense to say "a voucher for a front row seat," meaning a free ticket for a front row seat at a performance?

I'd appreciate your help.

  • yes, that's exactly what it means. – JavaLatte Jan 6 '18 at 0:04
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"A voucher for a front row seat" can be exchanged for a ticket. It might not be tied to a particular day or performance. However, if you mean "A free ticket" then just say "A free ticket".

The first prize is a voucher for a front row seat at any play at The Apollo theatre this summer.

Jack is sick and couldn't go to the theatre, so I got a free ticket to see Hamlet this evening.

  • Someone told me "voucher for a front row seat" is incorrect; he said "ticket for a front row seat" should be correct. What do you think? – Apollyon Jan 6 '18 at 9:00
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    Please read my answer above, where I explain exactly what I think. – James K Jan 6 '18 at 10:30

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