0

Consider this sentence: "Alex does not know the locations of US cities nor Toronto."

Two questions: A) Is it interpreted this in two ways?:

1) Alex does not know the locations of US cities, and he does not know Toronto. 2) Alex does not know the locations of US cities, and he does not know the location of Toronto.

How can we modify it to mention first?

B) The word "locations" cannot be attributed to "Toronto" since "locations" is plural but "Toronto" is singular. Right?

1

NOR

Alex does not know the locations of US cities nor Toronto.

STANDARD FORM: Alex neither knows the locations of US cities nor does he know Toronto.

| improve this answer | |
  • +1 because you are correct, but I'm not sure your standard form is totally right. "Alex knows neither the locations of US cities nor the location of Toronto." sounds better to me. I don't think I've ever seen "neither" placed before a verb like as you have done. – Readin Jan 7 '18 at 1:44
  • The original sentence is not the best. You have rewritten it, which is fine. However, for the neither/nor before the verb: I neither speak Russian nor do I write it. [kind of a silly sentence but it shows my point. :)] – Lambie Jan 7 '18 at 15:29
  • Your new example does sound better to me. I'm still not sure why your original example bothers me. – Readin Jan 7 '18 at 18:32
  • @Readin It bothers you because the original sentence I edited is not that great. – Lambie Jan 7 '18 at 18:46
  • but why is it not that great. That's what I can't figure out. – Readin Jan 7 '18 at 21:49

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.