1

I have done my schooling from St. Xaviers , I have given my 10th Boards from that school.

Or

I did my schooling from St.Xaviers, I gave my 10th Boards from my school.

Context- I did my schooling in 1998 but here i am not mentioning the time And I am telling my neice where I did my schooling from . What should I use ?

1

In the U.S. we usually say; I went to school at St. Xaviers.

and for the second sentence we say: "I had taken my 10th Boards from there".

[We don't need to say school because from the context we know you're talking about school so it becomes repetitive.] Also I use 'taken' because I assume it was you who took the test not you who was giving the test.

0

Since you have completed the event in the past, you would say,

I did my schooling at St. Xavier's.

You could also say it this way:

I graduated from St. Xavier's.

I don't agree with lina above because, if you were to say, "I went to school at St. Xavier's," that doesn't mean that you actually graduated, so such a statement could be ambiguous. My first rescript above using "did" seems to be implicit that you did graduate whereas my second rescript actually states that you graduated. I also do not agree with lina's use of the past perfect for the rescript of your second example. I would write it using the simple past:

I took my 10th Board (Exam) from there.

If you wanted to use the past perfect as lina points out, then context would be needed because the past perfect indicative usually means that that past event had occurred before another past event occurred:

I had taken my 10th Board (Exam) originally from St. Xavier's, but I didn't pass, so I retook it at St. Monica's a year later.

You have also created a comma splice above; rather than using a comma to combine these two statements, I would use a semicolon (;) if I were you:

I did my schooling at St. Xaviers; I (even) took my 10th Board (Exam) from there.

I hope that might have helped you out. Take care and good luck!

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