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Can we imagine from my below examples that when we reached the platform train was not on the platform?

a) When we reached the platform train was already left / gone.

b) When we reached the platform train had already left / gone.

2 Answers 2

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a) When we reached the platform, the train was already gone.

b) When we reached the platform, the train had already left.

In both cases above, after we have arrived at the platform, we discovered that the train has already left.

In other words, the train had already left but we didn't know this until we arrived on the platform. It is the order of events that is key here.

Order of events from both a) and b):

The Train left -> We arrived at platform -> Discovered train had already left

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  • This is correct, but it might help the OP more if you explained why this is the case...
    – stangdon
    Jan 9, 2018 at 14:21
  • Thanks for the answer....But does it mean the same that when we reached the Station train was not on the platform.
    – user4084
    Jan 9, 2018 at 14:23
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Sentence a) is incorrect

a) When we reached the platform, the train was already left/ gone.

This sentence is past simple tense in the passive voice.

'was left' and 'was gone' = be verb + past participle form of the verb makes the sentence a passive sentence. Since the verbs, 'leave and go' are intransitive (no object), we cannot construct a passive sentence.

The sentence can be reconstructed in simple past tense correctly as

The train left before we reached the station.

b) When we reached the platform, the train had already left.

This sentence is correct. The past perfect is often used with an adverb. Just, already, never and ever are placed in between the auxiliary had and the past participle.

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  • Sentence a) could be correct if "gone" is chosen instead of "left," since "gone" would be functioning as an adjective (meaning "absent") instead of as part of a passive construction. yesterday
  • I found more information here. "gone" can be used as an adjective. english.stackexchange.com/questions/3402/… 20 hours ago

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