1
  • At The Times, her remit is much the same, the news cycle driving in large part which public figures’ statements come in for a closer look.

Does the bald part is the main clause?

And

Does the following part that start with “the news cycle” noun phrase? Because it doesn’t have main verb? Is that right

2

Your analysis is mostly right.

"Her remit is much the same" is the main clause, as you say.

"the news cycle driving in large part which public figures’ statements come in for a closer look" is not a noun phrase, but non-finite (participial) clause.

Its meaning is similar to the separate sentence "The new cycles drives ... ", but using it as an absolute clause in this way indicates that there is a close but unspecified relationship between it and the main clause: here it further specifies her remit (i.e. what her job is).

  • I think, none-finite and absolute phrase are the same thing, aren’t they? – Stevan Slewa Jan 12 '18 at 0:13
  • 1
    No. Non-finite clauses are those with a non-finite verb as their head (either an infinitive or a participle). They can be used in various ways, of which absolute use is one. They can also be used, for example, as the subject or object of a verb, or the object of a preposition. – Colin Fine Jan 12 '18 at 13:53

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.