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What should I use? Whom or Who in this sentence

The Noble requests help from anyone with any clues as to whom may have done this.

or

The Noble requests help from anyone with any clues as to who may have done this.

  • The thin line between who and whom is vanishing in all English. – Maulik V Jan 12 '18 at 7:09
  • "(The Noble requests help) (from anyone) (with any clues) (as to) (who may have done this)." You can see who is the subject of it's phrase. But some people may automatically use whom after to, since to whom is commonly used in prepositional phrases. – user3169 Jan 12 '18 at 7:35
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  • "Who may have done this?" - "I/he/she/they/it/we/you did this"

Who is the subject in this phrase here.

  • 1
    * Who is the subject of the phrase, but not the subject of the sentence. This is an important distinction. – Davo Jan 12 '18 at 12:20
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As a basic rule of thumb who is the subject of the verb (the one doing the action) whom is the object of the verb (the one being acted upon) for further reading on who and whom: http://linguistech.ca/Tips+and+Tricks+-+Who+vs.+Whom

Thus, I believe who would be a better fit for this sentence because who is the subject of the verb because they are the ones doing the action.

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I think neither Who nor Whom are correct for this sentence.

The Noble requests help from anyone with any clues as to anyone who may have done this.

Or

The Noble requests help from anyone with any clues as to whoever may have done this.

Before who is always a noun.

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