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I have been wondering about this:

  1. It's not so much as a problem to us as it is a burden.
  2. It's not so much of a problem to us as it is a burden.
  3. It's not as much as a problem to us as it is a burden.
  4. It's not as much of a problem to us as it is a burden.
  5. It's not so much a problem to us as it is a burden.
  6. It's not as much a problem to us as it is a burden.

Which are correct and what actual difference is there between the six options?

Edit: Yes, sorry, the first time I pulled the fragments out of context and it does make sense not to do it. Since now with the full sentences I think that all of them are actually correct. The options 1, 2, and 5 are probably old-fashioned and wouldn't likely be used in PDE but does that make make 'wrong'? The "of" part is probably less common then the "no preposition" or the "as" part, right?

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    1 and 3 are simply wrong. 5–6 are best. 2 and 4 borrow ‘of’ from another idiom: “It's not much of a problem” means it may be a problem but only a little one. – Anton Sherwood Oct 30 at 6:14
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Those sentences all seem like fragments to me.

I think you're thinking of the phrase, "It's not so much of a (blank), as it is a (more positive spin on blank)." Ex. It's not so much so much a problem, as it is an opportunity to overcome obstacles.

If you're just trying to say something isn't a problem it's, "It's no problem," or "It's not a problem." The context for usually would be in response to someone asking something of you. By saying "It's not a problem," you are expressing that you wouldn't mind doing the favor as it isn't a burden on you. You can also say, "It isn't really a problem," if you want to express that it is a bit of a burden, but not a big one, or you don't mind taking on the burden.

  • I've edited the question to remove ambiguoality and make the question clearer. – SovereignSun Jan 14 '18 at 6:18

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