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  1. I'm writing to inform you about ...
  2. I'm writing the letter to inform you about ...

A friend of mine says that the former option is right when the second one is kind of tautology and unnecessary information.

Is it true? Can I use them interchangeable or one of the option is better than another?

  • l'm writing already conveys some kind of letter, message, or something else. Indeed, this seems like tautology to me. – SovereignSun Jan 14 '18 at 11:50
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I wouldn't say it's a tautology exactly, because you can write things other than letters. For example, you could write a book, a thesis, a play, or a poem, etc. In your example the fact you are writing a letter is obvious, since the reader will be reading the letter - therefore it's redundant.

If you do want to mention the letter, I wouldn't say "the letter", but "this letter". However, it's still redundant. I think it's better to leave it out. Take your friend's advice.

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