0

I heard it on a TV show. The girls moved in a new house. A man comes to the house and says: "Killer house, guys." There was a murder happened in this house, but that seems not to be what the man intended to say, because the girl had clarified it later by asking: "You meant nice house, right?"

I guess it means good or attractive house. It might also be harmful or dangerous house?

So, what does it truly mean?
man standing in a kitchen looking at two women with the subtitle "Killer house, guys."

  • I incorporated information from the comments into your question. You should have edited that context into your question yourself. It is important to the answers to know that in this show there had been a murder in the house. – ColleenV Jan 17 '18 at 12:43
2

Killer has a few different slang meanings. It can mean cool, great, awesome and that appears to be the usage here. For example,

Killer house, guys.
Great house, guys.

Perhaps he's being sarcastic, but more context is needed to determine that.

You can find more relevant definitions and examples in the Urban Dictionary entry: killer.

  • Is it a common slangy usage of killer? It seems that not everyone would understand it. – dan Jan 17 '18 at 10:26
  • @dan I don't know if it's common, but it is well-known. We needed context to make sure because many words have many meanings that could all make sense in isolated sentences and quotes. – Em. Jan 17 '18 at 10:31
  • Note that while the Urban Dictionary can be a great source for looking up slang terms, it has a rather weak peer review process and contains many entries that are private in-jokes or would otherwise not be widely understood. – arp Oct 17 '18 at 4:32
0

Without proper context "killer house" can convey:

  • {noun} A house that kills
  • {noun} An incredible or magnificent house
  • {noun} A noisy house where parties are often held or loud music is often played
  • {adjective} something/someone very loud or killing
  • {adjective} something/someone that wracks or is disastrous

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.