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Should I write like:

I don't like his manner, it is like I owed him a billion and am required to pay him back.

or:

I don't like his manner, it is like I owed him a billion and required to pay him back.

because I should "be required", I think the first one is more logical, but it sounds wired.

The second one sounds more nature but is it grammatically correct?

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  • Or it is like I owed him a billion and I am required to pay him back. ? It is definitely correct, but is it kind of too formal? – Ailrk Jan 14 '18 at 1:12
  • You shouldn't write either of those. They’re both wrong in many ways. Please see English Language Learners. – tchrist Jan 14 '18 at 1:43
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    Just - "I don't like his manner, he acts like I owe him a billion" - (notice owe in the present tense). Also the "...required to pay him back." is superfluous - that is exactly what is meant by "owe" - a requirement or obligation to pay. – Fraser Jan 14 '18 at 2:10
  • @Fraser - Is "owe" really correct? One has to use the subjunctive, no? – Nicolas Barbulesco Jan 14 '18 at 12:42
  • If you use the subjunctive owed, then the next verb should match its mood: were required. — But the subjunctive is now too formal to go with like, which I'd then change to as if. – Anton Sherwood Apr 6 at 22:29
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In my opinion, neither are good to be honest. I think this would work better:

I don't like his manner, it's like I owe him a billion and I'm required to pay him back.

  • This is neither passive nor a good construction. – Davo Jan 14 '18 at 15:04

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