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whole the chapter is full of printing errors which are the outcome of proof reader's carelessness.

Please tell the difference between the whole and whole the as a whole and in the context of above example.

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    "Whole the" is simply incorrect English. – SovereignSun Jan 18 '18 at 3:51
  • I concur. whole the is wrong. And as a rule of thumb, you should always specify the source of your examples. – Michael Rybkin Jan 18 '18 at 4:03
  • "Whole the" is wrong and is probably being used as a pun or a joke. See my answer below. – earksiinni Jan 19 '18 at 21:15
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It can be helpful to think of articles (a/an and the) as a special kind of adjective that always comes before any other adjective that modifies the same noun.

For example, "Look at the big blue dog" is correct, because the comes before the other adjectives. On the other hand, "I saw red a bird" is incorrect, because a comes after red, even though they both modify bird.

To use your example, "whole the chapter" is always wrong - the must come first. In contrast, "the whole chapter" is just fine, as it follows the rule.

For a more detailed overview of article usage, I encourage you to check out the Purdue Online Writing Lab (OWL) page on it.

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In the context

whole the chapter is full of printing errors which are the outcome of proof reader's carelessness.

"whole the" is probably being used as a pun or a clever little joke, because "whole the" is simply wrong. It's exactly the kind of mistake that you would expect from a printing error, like the one that the sentence you provided is describing. A native speaker would immediately see that the sentence should begin "the whole chapter is full of..."

In any other context, "whole the" is still wrong. It's simply gibberish and doesn't make sense. "The whole," on the other hand, is perfectly valid English and means exactly what you think it means (i.e., the entirety of something).

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