0

I haven't watched the movie all the way through.

I haven't watched the movie all the way.

I haven't watched the movie all the way to the end.

I haven't watched the movie to the end.

Do all these sentences mean the same thing that the speaker hasn't finished watching the movie? Is the through redundant, would it mean the same without it?

  • 1
    They're all fine, and almost always they would mean exactly the same thing. Stretching a point, if you'd seen the first half of the movie one night, then the second half sometime later, all the way through would work much better than [all the way [through]] to the end. But that's a contrived/unlikely context. – FumbleFingers Jan 20 '18 at 19:10

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.