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In this techcrunch article, I noticed a rather strange sentence:

Huawei’s CES press conference isn’t until later today, but the company’s already having a rough time of it.

I can't wrap my head around the "conference isn't until later today" part. Isn't it more common to say "the conference will not begin until later today"?

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The present tense simple is often used for a future event when there is a time expression indicating when the event is expected to take place.

The new, stricter regulations don't come into effect for five years, but automakers are already hard at work designing new technologies.

Just as acceptable is the future tense:

The new, stricter regulations won't come into effect for five years, but automakers are already hard at work designing new technologies.

With events in the near future — in your example in a matter of hours — the tendency would be even greater to use the present tense.

When is the concert?

It starts at 8:00, so we can eat around 7:00 and still make it on time.

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"Will not begin" is grammatically correct. The idiomatic "isn't" would be much more common. It is easier to say and others will understand what is meant.

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