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As for the usage of put across (phrasal verb) which one is correct?

'I have to study more so I can put across my ideas well.'

Or

I have to study more so I can put my ideas across well.'

P.S. when Googling, there are examples of separated 'put something across' but also there are instances that they stick together. Any other tips?

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It's your choice. The separated version is the more common, especially when the object phrase is short. If the object phrase becomes lengthy, you could keep put across together. But it's a stylistic decision, not a grammatical one.

He wanted to use the Tuesday open meeting to put his ideas relating to the development of a high-speed city-wide network with free access for all citizens on weekends across to City Council.

There, you might rephrase:

He wanted to use the Tuesday open meeting to put across to City Council his ideas relating to the development of a high-speed city-wide network with free access for all citizens on weekends.

P.S. In that case, not only would you be keeping the phrasal verb put across together, you would be moving the prepositional phrase to City Council, which refers to the recipients of what is put across, so that it, too, is not stranded after the long phrase containing the object.

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