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Say you've just read an online discussion post and want to comment on the fact that the writer has jumped from point A to point B without attempting to convince of the validity of the connection. What could you write on that would be more refined than "that's a bit of a stretch"? I should mention that I don't have continued interest in understanding their reasoning and am looking for no more than another way to say "that's a bit of a stretch."

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  • "Please show your reasoning for this assertion." Jan 23, 2018 at 13:16
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    That's a big leap. Jan 23, 2018 at 13:17
  • @JeffZeitlin Ah, I've chosen a poor example. I want a phrase that can be uttered when one doesn't actually care to understand the reasoning behind the assertion. Jan 23, 2018 at 13:19
  • I'd format it as a question: You didn't explain the connection between A and B very well; care to explain your reasoning? or Jumping from A to B is a big leap of logic; care to explain your reasoning? Jan 23, 2018 at 13:24
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    A big leap is relatively common, as phrases go. In my humble opinion, it's not too informal to use here. Jan 23, 2018 at 13:29

2 Answers 2

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Tell me if this fits your requirements:

Wow. That's quite a leap.

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I might format it like a question:

Jumping from A to B is a big leap of logic; care to explain your reasoning?

You didn't explain the connection between A and B very well; care to explain your reasoning?

The latter fragment, care to explain your reasoning? could be omitted at your discretion.


However,

The logical jump between A and B is a bit of a stretch...

Would be perfectly reasonable -- It's not too informal.
Optionally, if bit of feels too informal,

The logical jump between A and B is quite a stretch...


Formatting it as a question like this isn't necessarily the only way to do it, though. Use your discretion.

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    I agree with you – I think "bit of a stretch" is more figurative than informal. (One could use "quite a stretch" if "bit of" seems too informal.)
    – J.R.
    Jan 23, 2018 at 15:01

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