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WAR AND PEACE

she thought, feeling that the Almighty Hand, hitherto unseen, was becoming manifest in all that was now taking place. “Well, Mamma? Everything is ready. What's the matter?” asked Natasha, as with animated ...

  • What does the adverb “now” imply in this context? Which came with past tense.

  • Does it give the meaning of “up to “that” moment”, on the contrary as it usually implies “at this moment”?

  • I think if the sentence were this way, replacing “had been” with “was”, it would be more better and appropriate to the context to make sense of “up to that moment”.

To go such way:

she thought, feeling that the Almighty Hand, hitherto unseen, was becoming manifest in all that had now been taking place. “Well, Mamma? Everything is ready. What's the matter?” asked Natasha, as with animated ...

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  • What do you think?

Oxford dictionary: Now

  • (at) the present time
  • Where are you living now?

  • It's been two weeks now since she called.

  • It's too late now.

  • From now onI'll be more careful.

  • He'll be home by now.

  • I've lived at home up till now.

  • That's all for now.

  • at or from this moment, but not before
  • Start writing now.
  • I am now ready to answer your questions.
  • (informal) used to show that you are annoyed about something
  • Now they want to tax food!

  • What do you want now?

  • It's broken. Now I'll have to get a new one.

  • used to get someone's attention before changing the subject or asking them to do something
  • Now, listen to what she's saying.
  • Now, the next point is quite complex.
  • Now come and sit down.
  • Now let me think…
  • Your changed excerpt (...that has now been taking...) mixes tenses in an incongrous way. – SIGSTACKFAULT Jan 25 '18 at 1:24
  • Sorry, I just edited it, and replaced “had” with “has”. @Blacksilver – Bavyan Yaldo Jan 25 '18 at 1:28
  • Still mixes tenses in a similarly incongruous way. – SIGSTACKFAULT Jan 25 '18 at 1:31
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In narrative, now can refer to a center-of-consciousness (an intelligence, an ego) as having a sense of The Present, at a time in the past.

Her "this moment", her "now", is our "that moment", our "then".

His parents had been murdered in an alley, and now he was alone, alone with his great fear of bats.

This is a very old usage of now and is attested even in the English spoken in medieval times, 9th-10 century.

  • Could we simply say: now with past= at the exact or precise moment of past? – Bavyan Yaldo Jan 25 '18 at 19:57
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    The Present has a penumbra. Exactitude and precision are inapt. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Jan 25 '18 at 19:58
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was now refers to what was happening at the time she was thinking. According to this NGram, this usage is quite common.

Past perfect refers to things that took place before some event in the past: for want of any other event, we assume that it's before she was thinking. If that is so, you can't apply now to what happened before she was thinking.

She thought, feeling that the Almighty Hand, hitherto unseen, was becoming manifest in all that had been taking place. “Well, Mamma? Everything is ready. What's the matter?” asked Natasha, as with animated ...

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