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I often see both appearances "Come, sit..." and "Come sit...", which is correct?

P.s. what if there are three consecutive verbs?

  • Come, sit, tell me your story.
  • Come sit, tell me your story.
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    Typographic conventions attempting to represent speech are not fixed. You could just as easily punctuate that as Come, sit. Tell me your story. or Come, sit, and tell me... Come, like go, can be complemented by bare infinitive(s). – Tᴚoɯɐuo Jan 26 '18 at 10:46
  • Come, sit, and tell me your story. This is more appropriate(very likely), coz come sit, tell me your story might be misinterpreted(particularly come sit(it's like a newly formed phrasal verb), also, when you pronounce the verbs: come(1st stress),sit(2nd stress)......story(3rd stress).. people will undertand you more clearly. – John Arvin Jan 26 '18 at 11:50
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    Commas in written language only mirror the pauses in spoken language. Can you say "Come sit" with no pause? Yes. Can you put a pause in there, "Come, sit." Yes. Which is more natural? It depends on the context of the rest of the sentence, and who is doing the talking. – Andrew Jan 26 '18 at 14:24
  • Come, sit. Tell me your story. versus: Come sit here [and tell me your story]. Come sit. [one sentence, yes] but not: Come sit, tell me your story. – Lambie Jan 26 '18 at 17:18
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Those are not the only alternatives. You could also have three complete imperative sentences.

Come. Sit. Tell me your story.

However, there is a pattern "come" or "go" followed by a bare infinitive.

Come play tennis.

Let's go eat.

This pattern is mostly used in speech. The expression "come play" acts like a single verb. It forms a single intonation phrase when spoken; there is no pause between the words "come" and "play". When used like this it would not be separated by a comma.

The last part "tell me your story" is a complete sentence. So a full-stop would not be out of place. My prefered punctuation for how I would speak this phrase would be:

Come sit. Tell me your story.

The comma separated version is completely understandable. It is in no way ambiguous. I doubt anyone would care very much if you put commas between each verb.

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P.s. what if there are three consecutive verbs?

Come, sit, tell me your story. Come sit, tell me your story.

You can have more than three. There are many possible formulations depending on pauses and emphasis.

Come, sit, have a glass of wine, tell me your story.

Come and sit. Have a glass of wine and tell me your story.

Come sit and have a glass of wine. Tell me your story.

etc.

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