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According to this dictionary, Americans use "spoiled" past tense and past participle, whereas British people use either "spoilt" or "spoiled."

So, my question is:

Can I say "a spoiled child" when I'm in the United States, instead of "a spoilt child"? Or maybe it's not possible because, in that particular example "a spoilt child" is a fixed term understood in American and British English.

"A spoilt child is rarely popular with other children. Oh, that child. He's so spoiled."

my afterthought:

I've just realized that I thought "a spoilt child" is a fixed term with a particular meaning and I have never thought that American people don't use "spoilt." I also thought that "spoilt" appeared as an adjective in both languages, which is not true.

Even Wikipedia used that term!

  • @Max I've just edited my question. – Codewife_101 Jan 27 '18 at 7:49
  • @Max I've just realized that I thought "a spoilt child" is a fixed term with a particular meaning and I have never thought that American people don't use "spoilt." I also thought that "spoilt" appeared as an adjective in both languages, which is not true. – Codewife_101 Jan 27 '18 at 8:02
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In the U.S., we would say "a spoiled child." We just flat out don't use past participles like spoilt, learnt, or spelt, in any context. They're 100% BrE. I believe Canadians wouldn't use them, either. Although I admit, I have no idea whether they're used in Australia or New Zealand.

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