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I'm having a debate between my friends and my English teacher, it came up during a practice conversation in class and I said that "How does my soul taste" and they proceeded to correct me by saying that it's said "How does my soul tastes" given the fact that it is referred to as "He/she/it", what is the correct way to say it?

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  • Well a chef would ask, “How does my sole taste?” – Jim Jan 27 '18 at 20:15
  • Wow. That was a relatively quick way of answering! Thanks @Jim ! – Jan Janoi Jan 27 '18 at 20:17
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In English, there can be only one conjugated verb that agrees with the subject.

  1. Did he really eat a dozen chocolate bars at one sitting?
  2. She has already done her homework.
  3. We were not consulted on this project.

Your friend's sentence

*How does my sole tastes?

would then have two conjugated verbs, which doesn't work in English. It must be:

How does my sole taste?

I presume you are talking about a type of fish, sole, rather than the soul.

  • Actually did I mean to say soul, it doesn't make sense but it is a translation of a phrase from our language and that's why it's soul. – Jan Janoi Jan 27 '18 at 20:55
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    OK, but that won't affect subject-verb agreement, so it's the same whether sole or soul. – KarlG Jan 27 '18 at 20:58
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  1. How does my soul taste?

  2. How tastes my soul?

In the first example, which matches the one given in your question, the auxiliary verb verb does is used along with the verb taste.

In the second example, which is suggested by your friends' and teacher's understanding of the idea, the auxiliary verb should be omitted, to match the change of form for the verb tastes.

To test it:

  • He tastes. He does taste.
  • She tastes. She does taste.
  • It tastes. It does taste.

The use of the auxiliary verb is optional; it's mainly a matter of style and context or emphasis.

See also: "How it works?" vs "How does it work?"

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