0

I have read a sentence like this and I wonder why the writer used "of" right after the verb "to be" Is it okay to use be+of? And what did he mean by using like this?

The concept is of multi-storey buildings in which food crops are grown in environmentally controlled conditions.

1
  • It means that something has been said earlier in the text. And then here they are pinpointing it: The concept concerns x, would be the same thing.
    – Lambie
    Feb 1, 2018 at 1:35

1 Answer 1

1

The sentence has been taken from here.

Although the sentence is grammatically correct, I find it to be rather poor. Subject complements starting with "of" are indeed infrequent. I would have suggested changing it to:

  • One such proposal is for the 'Vertical Farm', based on the concept of multi-storey buildings in which food crops are grown in environmentally controlled conditions.

OR

  • One such proposal is for the 'Vertical Farm', which consists of multi-storey buildings in which food crops are grown in environmentally controlled conditions.

OR

  • One such proposal is for the 'Vertical Farm', which has been conceived of as multi-storey buildings in which food crops are grown in environmentally controlled conditions.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .