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  1. We all love the good quotes, especially love ones.

    or

  2. We all love the good quotes, especially about love.

The idea is to express in a short way that we love good quotes about love. Do these sentences have the same meaning? I'd rather use the first sentence because I wanted to use an adjective, though I'm not sure which one sounds more natural.

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Neither sentence is correct or particularly clear.

For both sentences, you should only use the if you are talking about specific quotes, for example ones that you mentioned in an earlier sentence.

If you had a lot of quotes and sorted them into two piles, good ones and not-so-good ones, If you point at the pile of good quotes, they are specific, so you should use the, for example "These are the good quotes". In the first part of your sentence, you are talking about quotes in general- including quotes that have not even been written yet, so you should not use the.

The first sentence is confusing. You can use an adjective before ones if it's clear that it is an adjective. "The red ones" works, but "the love ones" doesn't. Love can be verb, noun and adjective, and you have added to the confusion by using it as a verb in the first part of the sentence. If you replaced ones by quotes, it would be clear.

We all love good quotes, especially love quotes.

The second sentence is better, but could be made more natural by adding ones in front of about.

We all love good quotes, especially ones about love.

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    Or change quotes to quote: We all love the good quote, especially when it's about love. That would be idiomatic alongside We all love a good quote... – Tᴚoɯɐuo Feb 2 '18 at 14:12

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