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I came across this sentence while watching movie.

"We just never should've let you get mixed up in the damned thing."

I know that "should've" is used when I express the things i regret. So I think it's enough to just say that "We should've let you get mixed up in the damned thing.", but the actor didn't say above sentence. He added "never" in front of "should"

Is there any difference meaning between them? and also I'd like to know a role of "just" in that sentence.

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    You misunderstand what "should've" means. – Hot Licks Feb 4 '18 at 3:55
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The word "never" is central to the meaning of your example sentence.

Saying

We never should've let you ...

is equivalent to saying

We shouldn't have let you ...

Notice in both of these example is a word indicating negation of the statement - "never" in the first, and "not" in the second (hidden in the contraction "shouldn't").

With the word "never", the sentence means the speaker "let you get mixed up", but wishes they didn't. Without the word "never", the sentence means the speaker didn't "let you" get mixed up", but wishes they did.


As for the role of "just" in the sentence, it doesn't necessarily change the meaning. It does give the sentence a "summary" feeling, as though it comes at the end of a longer explanation of why the speaker "shouldn't have let you get mixed up". That's one way to use "just", and feels like the most likely sense here.

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It might help you to get rid of the contraction. "We never should have let you get mixed up in the damned thing."

If you take out "never" then you get the opposite meaning: "We should have let you get mixed up in the damned thing."

"Just" in this context appears to mean 'instead of' or 'alternatively'. With dialogue, sometimes words including "just" or "like" are filler words to represent how we naturally speak.

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