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Social problems can no longer be solved by class warfare any more than international problems can be solved by wars between nations.

I think 'any more' is redundant because there is already comparative degree 'no longer', so it seems better that 'any more' has to be deleted as in Social problems can no longer be solved by class warfare than international problems can be solved by wars between nations.

Is my thinking correct??

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You are right about any more sounding wrong, but that's because the author attempted to use a standard form but got it wrong. The standard form is:

One cannot do X any more than one can do something impossible.
One cannot become rich on the stock exchange any more than one can get blood from a stone.

In this context, any more has the literal meaning to a greater extent: used in this standard form, it must be followed by than.

The writer made the mistake of changing cannot to can no longer in order to add the concept that it used to be possible but that it isn't any more. It is not clear, though, whether the no longer is intended to apply only to X, or to both X and the impossible activity.

In addition, this confuses the standard form, because no longer seems to be duplicated by the temporal meaning of the expression any more. Note that this meaning does not work with than, so it is definitely not what the author intended.

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  • Could I regard 'any more' as an element for emphasizing? I mean the writer deliberately wrote it to be duplicated for emphasizing.
    – GKK
    Feb 6 '18 at 10:30
  • No, I don't think he did. The duplication requires the temporal meaning "no longer" and it cannot be followed by than, but in my opinion he was aiming for the standard expression, which requires the "to a greater extent" meaning and must be followed by than.
    – JavaLatte
    Feb 6 '18 at 13:58
  • Now I know how to understand the sentence. I have overlooked the intended meaning that 'no longer' means 'not' semantically in the sentence.
    – GKK
    Feb 6 '18 at 17:02

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