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Could you tell me which one is right? If there is not any correct sentence, what would be the right sentence? I do not really know how to write these kinds of sentences correctly.

  1. She gives and receives advice to and from them.
  2. She gives and receives advice from them.

And how about these?

  1. She sings when she goes to the place and comes from the place.
  2. She sings when she goes and comes from the place.
  3. She sings when she goes and comes to and from the place.
  4. She sings when she goes to and comes from the place.
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Giving and receiving advice:

First Set: She gives them advice and receives it from them. OR She gives them advice and receives advice from them.

Second set: She sings when she goes to the place and comes from the place. [FINE]

She sings when she goes and comes to and from the place [respectively]. [FINE]

She sings when she goes to and comes from the place. [FINE]

Simplest: She sings when she goes to and from the place. [most usual]

Also: She sings going to and coming from the place.

She sings on her way to and from the place. [simplest of all]

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  • Thank you for answering my question. If "She sings when she goes and comes from the place" is correct. can I omit 'to' and just write 'from' only? I mean if there are two verbs like the foregoing sentence, can the first preposition for the first verb be omitted? – James Feb 6 '18 at 17:37
  • I had a mistake; "She sings when she goes TO and FROM the place". You can omit the "the" but not the "to". Sorry. – Lambie Feb 6 '18 at 17:43
  • So can 'comes' be omitted? – James Feb 6 '18 at 17:46
  • Yes, I think so. The comes is implied, actually. "We go to and from work" in the truck. – Lambie Feb 6 '18 at 17:50
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In the first set of sentences, none of them is correct. We should revise the way we express the idea.

She exchanges advice with them.

or

They exchange advice

In the second set, it is necessary to add an extra relative clause (clause starting with when):

She sings when she goes to the place and when she comes back.

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  • I am not sure that exchange advice is usual collocation. – Lambie Feb 6 '18 at 17:44

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