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We're pleased to inform you that you have been screened for the final round which is going to be a technical Skype interview (not the knockout coding round for some reasons).

What do these lines mean? I am confused what they are talking about. Please, can you explain me in simpler manner?

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  • Did you sign up for some competition? If you did, then they just informed you that you are passed to the final round. And in the final round, you must have a technical interview via Skype. (I don't know the nature of what you've signed up to.) Also, the knockout coding round was cancelled. They didn't give the reason of this cancellation. Commented Jan 10, 2014 at 19:03
  • Incidentally, how does something get closed as being unclear while having an excellent, detailed answer?
    – JamieB
    Commented Jun 22, 2016 at 20:35

1 Answer 1

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Perhaps you could make clear just what you don't understand. Are the sentences a total mystery or is it just one word or phrase that is a problem?

We're pleased to inform you

This is boiler plate for introducing good news.

that you have been screened for the final round

They have several "rounds", like in a game, and in each round they eliminate some applicants for the job. You have made it to the last round.

which is going to be a technical Skype interview

Do you know that Skype is an on-line video communication system? So they want to use Skype to interview you, rather than talking on the phone, meeting in person, etc. It will be a "technical" interview, that is, an interview with someone knowledgeable about technical matters who will be trying to find out your skill level, as opposed to the more general interviews done by people from the personnel department which try to weed out the obvious idiots, people whose personalities would not fit in the company, and so on.

(not the knockout coding round for some reasons)."

This sentence is curious, especially the "for some reason". They're not going to give you a programming quiz -- I take it you're applying for a programming job. The person sending the email doesn't know why they're not going to give you a programming quiz. But it's rather odd for someone to send you an email saying he doesn't know why he's doing what he's doing. I presume he's saying that his boss or the personnel department or someone other than the author of the email made this decision and he doesn't agree with it, but it's generally considered bad form to criticize co-workers to outsiders.

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