0

When I come across a sentence with "All of" or "All", I always get confused between them.

I stopped to greet all my friends.

I stopped to greet all of my friends.

Are there any differences between the sentences above?

  • There is no difference in this sentence. – Andrew Feb 6 '18 at 22:11
1

I think you meant to say is there a difference between

I stopped to greet all my friends.

and

I stopped to greet all of my friends

These two sentences use different words, but the meaning is identical.

In fact, I suspect that the first is simply a shortened version of the second. That is, if I was transcribing and someone said "all my friends," I would likely write down "all of my friends." It sounds a little more complete, which is what you want in written English. No one will complain if you use the first form, though.

1

I stopped to greet my friends.

I stopped to greet all of my friends.

Both are grammatical, without any difference in meaning.

When you want to refer to every thing or person in a group, You can use all or all of in front of a possessive determiner + plural noun. However, the use of "all" is far more common than that of "all of".

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.