2

Here is from the dictionary

Sorry (adj): [not before noun] feeling sad and sympathetic

sorry (that)… I'm sorry that your husband lost his job.

sorry (to see, hear, etc.) We're sorry to hear that your father's in hospital again.

sorry (about something) No one is sorrier than I am about what happened.

Sorry (adj): [not before noun] feeling sad and ashamed about something that has been done

sorry (about something) We're very sorry about the damage to your car.

sorry (for something/doing something) He says he's really sorry for taking the car without asking.

sorry (that)… She was sorry that she'd lost her temper.

If you say you're sorry we'll forgive you.

Sorry (adj): [not before noun] feeling disappointed about something and wishing you had done something different or had not done something

sorry (that)… She was sorry that she'd lost contact with Mary.

You'll be sorry if I catch you!

sorry to do something I was genuinely sorry to be leaving college.

This site says:

When do we use to be sorry to and to be sorry for? Have a look at the following sentences, it´s really easy!

To be sorry to + infinitive = to apologise for a present action

I´m sorry to interrupt but could you come with me for a second?

To be sorry for + verb with -ing = to apologise for a past/earlier action

I´m sorry for lying to you, I won´t do it again

I would say:

"I am sorry to miss your concert" means I'n sorry before I do it

"I am sorry for missing your concert" means I'm sorry after I did it

  • Yes, I think you are correct and that you answered your own question. – joiedevivre Feb 9 '18 at 7:32
-1

"I am sorry to miss your concert" means I'm sorry before I do it

"I am sorry for missing your concert" means I'm sorry after I did it

Almost! "I'm sorry to miss your concert" is in the present, not the future. If the concert is happening right now, and you are missing it, then this is correct.

From your example:

I'm sorry to interrupt but could you come with me for a second?

If someone says this, they are interrupting at the present moment; they're not apologizing for interrupting in the future.

I don't think there's a nice single preposition you can use for the future. If the concert is in the future, I'd say "I'm sorry that I will miss your concert".

You can also use "I'm sorry that" with any verb tense:

I'm sorry that I will miss your concert.

I'm sorry that I am missing your concert.

I'm sorry that I missed your concert.

Many native speakers drop "that" and just say "I'm sorry I..."

Happy apologizing! :)

  • As a native English speaker, I would say, “I’m sorry to miss your concert,” to talk about a future event, and I find this fully grammatical. Also, “Sorry I’m missing your concert,” which feels slightly more casual. – mamster Feb 15 '18 at 21:15

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.