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In some texts related to an administrative authority, the following extract is present:

You can apply for an administrative review of that decision, if you think we have:

  • reached an incorrect decision on the grounds that your circumstances have changed
  • reached an incorrect decision on the grounds that you failed to tell us about something relevant to your application
  • ...

There are several such sentences using on the grounds that.

I'm trying to grasp the exact meaning of those phrases, among the following interpretations:

  1. We stated that you failed to tell it about something relevant to your application; you believe that led to an incorrect decision.

  2. You failed to tell us about something relevant to your application; you believe that led to an incorrect decision.

Is there one of the above that is clearly the intended meaning here, or is the phrase ambiguous enough that both could be inferred?

[Disclaimer: I am not engaged with the authority in question, nor do I request legal advice; this is just about the intended meaning of such constructions.]

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From MW:

on the grounds that

: for the reason that : because
Many critics have objected to the proposal on the grounds that it would be too costly.

  • Well, I had read that but assumed that somehow there might be other meanings according to the context. I think my question is somewhat worthless so if someone wishes to close it as not very useful, I wouldn't mind. – anol Feb 10 '18 at 15:50

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