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That was in Crash Course Astronomy. The sentence it was used in is at around :26. The speaker is showing a meteorite in his hand to the camera.

Cambot, can we get this up on still store?

What is still store and what does get up mean there?

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It is not a common expression, and I had to do some searching to find out.

Note that the presenter says "Cambot, can we get this up on still store". He is addressing the "Cambot", not the viewer. In other words it is jargon used by people who make TV.

So we can now make some inferences. "Get this up on" means put something on the screen for viewers to see (or possibly put something in a recording). A "still" is a non-moving image. The show uses a combination of video (the presenter talking to the camera for example), animated graphics, and stills (for example photographs of meteors). These need to me mixed together, and a TV studio will use a video mixer and switcher to do this. One feature that a video mixer may have is the ability to store stills, and mix between video and stills.

A still store is a feature of some video mixers, and get this up means record an image. Overall it means

Cambot, can you record a still image of this?

The presenter is addressing the producer to ask them take a still image of the meteorites in his hand. What's not clear is why he does this. In fact he is quoting the television show Mystery Science Theater 3000, and “Cambot, can you get this up on still store?” is a direct quotation from that show. Cambot is a character from the show. The phrase was often used when presenting fan mail to television viewers.

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  • Just because a still isn't shown later in that broadcast doesn't mean the still won't be used in a subsequent broadcast. That's my guess. – J.R. Feb 15 '18 at 14:50
  • That's a reasonable supposition – James K Feb 15 '18 at 20:54
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    This question was asked years ago, but for what it’s worth, Cambot is a character from the television show Mystery Science Theater 3000, and “Cambot, can you get this up on still store?” is a direct quotation from that show. The phrase was often used when presenting fan mail to television viewers. – Michael Westbom Apr 25 at 13:41

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