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I have some confusion about whether a word after respective should always be a plural.

I have changed a sentence from

  1. (a) For aerial A and aerial B the masts were moved within 2 feet of the park boundary, due to a shift in position of each solar panel/recorder unit, and so in these two cases the output cables extend beyond the 100 ft boundary.

to

  1. (b) For aerial A and aerial B, the masts were moved within 2 feet of the park boundary due to a shift in position of their respective solar panel/recorder units and, in these two cases, the output cables extend beyond the 100 ft boundary.

(Each aerial is connected to one solar panel/recorder unit, which is mentioned before this sentence)

Also have I used the commas correctly in sentence 1(b) and 2?

  1. Only one station, Epsilon, is affected by light pollution due to its distance from the main gate and as a result we exclude it from our analysis.
  • "respective"" and "respectively" can go together with both singular and plural depending on the quantity of nouns. – SovereignSun Feb 16 '18 at 4:26
  • @SovereignSun: maybe a little research might have been a good idea before making that comment. "Separately or individually and in the order already mentioned (used when enumerating two or more items or facts that refer back to a previous statement)" en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/respectively – JavaLatte Feb 16 '18 at 6:22
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In this example, "units" is plural because it refers to more than one unit. It is possible to have a singular after "respective" it one is only referring to one thing. E.g.:

"Each aerial is connected to it's respective recorder unit and solar panel."

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The definition for respective in the Oxford Dictionary is " Belonging or relating separately to each of two or more people or things."

Note the two or more: the following noun has to be plural. Respective means that Aerial A belongs to unit A, aerial B belongs to unit B, et cetera. Using respective for one person or thing would be like one hand clapping.

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