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These interpretations affect the adult's behavior, all of which may be more closely related to the adult's filters than to the child's actual behavior.

Is it ok to place the bracketed clause below at the end of the sentence as shown in the sentence right above because it is too long?

These interpretations, [all of which may be more closely related to the adult's filters than to the child's actual behavior], affect the adult's behavior.

Could you help me clarify it? Thank you always.

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It depends how you link the clauses together. The problem with all of which is that, as a relative pronoun, it associates with the nearest noun, which is usually the object of the previous clause. In this case, that's the adult's behaviour.

If, instead, you use and, you are using parallelling to link the clause to the subject of the previous sentence ,which is These interpretations:

These interpretations affect the adult's behavior, and may be more closely related to the adult's filters than to the child's actual behavior.

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You could recast the first clause into the passive, and thereby unite "all of which..." with the appropriate noun:

The adult's behavior is affected by these interpretations, all of which [interpretations] may be more closely related to the adult's filters than to the child's actual behavior.

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Note: my answer now makes little sense due to a major reworking of the question by the asker.

I like the way you've written the first one. I think it is clear and easy to understand.

With your second version, having the 'affect the adult's behaviour' at the very end, is making it hard the grasp the meaning.

I think that that is better nearer the start as it is what the sentence is about. Putting things in temporal order a, then b, then c, is easier to grasp than c, then b, then a, which is making my mind turn cartwheels!

You could leave out 'all of' if it isn't really needed, and just keep 'which'. But I think you need 'all of' - because you are referring to both 'the interpretations' and 'the adults behaviour' aren't you? They are probably iterative, feeding each other, I imagine.

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  • There is a momentary disruption as the reader must adjust: all of which refers back to interpretations. The sentence is not a model of clarity. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Feb 16 '18 at 13:29
  • 'All of which' can refer to all the stuff before the comma.. True, it is not a model of clarity 🙂 – Jelila Feb 16 '18 at 13:45
  • But all of which cannot refer back to a simple assertion: The sand was very hot, all of which made it painful to walk barefoot would be ungrammatical. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Feb 16 '18 at 13:54
  • Your example isn't really valid as there is it only thing in it - sand. Another example with 2 things like the sentence we are discussing: Black sands, white sands - all of which were very hot and made it painful to walk barefoot. Refers to the black sands and the white sands. – Jelila Feb 16 '18 at 14:07
  • In the original example, it is a simple assertion "These interpretations affect the adult's behavior". How is that different from "The biting flies make me angry, all of which ...."? – Tᴚoɯɐuo Feb 16 '18 at 14:44

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