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Let A and B be whole numbers such that B = A + A ÷ 2.

Assuming I need to express it as greater than, I could say:

B is half-of-A greater than A.

But I want to get rid of the hyphens. I want to know the alternative way to express how much one is greater than another one, in one complete sentence. How do I do it?

Also how do I express B = A + C ÷ 2 with greater than and no hyphens, in a natural way if possible?

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  • B equals A plus one half of A. B=A + 1/2 B
    – Lambie
    Feb 16 '18 at 19:07
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    It's not quite "greater than", but you can say "B is half again as great as A." Feb 17 '18 at 1:23
  • @CanadianYankee half again is new one to me. Thank you. I know that it's not an inequality, but I wanted to emphasize how much the difference is. Feb 17 '18 at 1:52
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A natural way to express this is to use percentages.

B is 50% greater than A

There are alternatives

B is 1½ times A

B is 150% of A

To say B = A + C/2 you could say

B is 50% of C greater than A

although at some point it becomes simpler just to read the mathematical expression:

B equals A plus C over two.

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  • May I ask you one more question: how do I express B = A + C ÷ 2 with greater than and no hyphens, in a natural way if possible? Feb 16 '18 at 20:12
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    I've copied your supplementary question to the question.
    – James K
    Feb 16 '18 at 21:14
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The idiom you could use in this case is half again as. So you would say:

B is half again as large as A.

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