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Let's say your discussing about the reason you have chosen a particular hobby. what is the correct preposition here:

1)...math is superb, and it turns me on to the fact that I am lucky that I have a burning passion for this.

Or

2)...math is superb, and it turns me to the fact that I am lucky that I have a burning passion for this.

P.s:I have just heard the #1 several minutes ago, she was kinda fluent but I am doubtful if this number 1 is grammatical. The #2 example came from mine(I am also in doubt hehe)

  • I disagree with that. It turns me onto the fact that. Turns me to the fact is not grammatical/idiomatic. – Lambie Feb 17 '18 at 18:14
  • @Lambie I changed my comment to an answer. I'm not sure if the idiom "turn me to (something)" is ubiquitous, but it doesn't seem that weird to me. – Andrew Feb 17 '18 at 18:20
  • You both guys have a contradictory answer, I am quite ambivalent right now, really. Which is which then?(this regards to both #1 and #2) – John Arvin Feb 17 '18 at 20:53
  • Relevant note: There's a very similar-sounding idiom "to turn someone on" which means "to sexually arouse someone". Confusing these in public might lead to some serious misunderstandings... – C. R. Yasuo Feb 18 '18 at 20:22
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The first is the idiom you want, although, this is not quite how you use "turn someone on to something". The thing you're turned on to doesn't do the turning on

In high school I had a wonderful math teacher who turned me on to the subject, so much so that I ended up getting a PhD in applied mathematics.

"Turns X to Y" means "direct X's attention to Y",. The common usage is in something like a lecture or meeting:

And so it is resolved that the cafeteria will not serve spaghetti more than two days in a row. Which turns us to the next topic: desserts.

A related, and probably more common idiom is "bring us to X":

That brings us to the next item on the agenda ...

  • You both guys have a contradictory answer, I am quite ambivalent right now, really. Which is which then?(this regards to both #1 and #2) – John Arvin Feb 17 '18 at 20:53
  • @JohnArvin It may be that the idiom "turn me to" is local to a particular dialect. You can't expect every English speaker to agree about everything. Otherwise both Lambie and I agree that "turn me on to" is the correct idiom for what you are trying to say. – Andrew Feb 17 '18 at 21:13

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