0

Consider:

The outside air is introduced into the house through the duct that connects the inside and outside of the house.

I rewrote this more specifically as follows:

The duct is open/exposed to the inside and outside walls of the house.

I would like to know which of "open" and "exposed" makes sense or is better.

  • 2
    I think it's slightly odd to talk about something like a duct "opening" to both sides of the wall it passes through. I'd normally think of the duct as being "present" in the room, and "opening" wherever it does on the outside wall. But personally I'd use the verb form (The duct opens to the outside wall) rather than adjectival (is open to...). And I'd say that although you might get away with "exposed", it seems to suggest that in other circumstances it might not reach open air and be exposed - which is pretty meaningless for a duct. – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica Feb 17 '18 at 18:46
  • Outside of "architect jargon" contexts, it might be more natural to say something like The inside duct [vent] leads [through] to the outside wall. – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica Feb 17 '18 at 18:52
  • Is there anything particular about the first sentence that you think is wrong. Why did you want to rewrite it? – James K Feb 17 '18 at 19:49
  • suggested change: Outside air comes into the house through the duct from the outside.There is no need to repeat house here. This really sounds like translation to me, which is why I simplified it. Like I often do for sentences in other languages, which I translate into English. – Lambie Feb 17 '18 at 20:23
  • 1
    No, it does not. And it's far from your original idea. The air comes into the house through ducts in the WALL. :) :) – Lambie Feb 18 '18 at 18:07
1

An air duct brings outside air into the house or carries inside air out. It is a given that there will be a duct opening on the exterior wall (or roof) and a duct opening on an interior wall (or ceiling).

If you want to find a verb for this opening of the duct, that verb would be opens, complemented by a prepositional phrase introduced by to:

One end of the duct opens to the outside and the other end of the duct opens to an interior space.

Here are some examples.

  • I want to focus attention on "wall" not "space". According to your advice, it is possible to use the expression " duct has an opening on a wall ". Is it possible to use the expression "duct opens to a wall"? – rama9 Feb 18 '18 at 17:59
  • 1
    No, it cannot open to a wall. It must open to an open area, either to another duct or to an open space. For example, the duct opens to the outside (not to the outer wall). If you want to focus on the wall, don't use the verb, but the noun: The opening of the duct is on the outer wall. The duct opens to the exterior|interior. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Feb 18 '18 at 18:05
1

The outside air is introduced into the house through the duct that connects the inside and outside of the house.=

Outside air comes into the house through a duct.

Meaning-wise, no more is needed. That is how technical English would express this.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.