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Logue is a man who must cure his own demons – a sense of failure over never having made it as a professional actor – and who is everywhere patronised as a colonial.

Sense of failure didn't allow him to become an actor or he didn't become an actor and it oppresses him now?

  • sense of failure about the fact he never became a professional actor. We say: to have sense of x about or over verb+ ing etc. – Lambie Feb 18 '18 at 22:07
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"never having made it as a professional actor" does not mean that he never became a professional actor. It means that he did, but was not successful in that profession. He was always the chap who came on stage carrying a spear but with no words to speak, rather than the man who played Hamlet.

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The word over here means: with regard to the subject of, in terms of, concerning, etc.

a sense of failure over [with regard to, about, concerning, on the subject of] never having made it as a professional actor

With words relating to situations, you will often find this word over,

  • We had a disagreement over the money she owed me.

  • I felt very bad over the situation that had developed.

  • He had a sense of failure over the way the situation was handled.

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