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What's the meaning and usage of “Let's keep in touch”?

My friend said to me, “Let's keep in touch” I don't know the meaning

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Keep in touch is an idiom. "In touch" means "in or into communication". In business, keep in touch usually means "keep posting information to each other". For close friends, I usually take it as "let's stay close" (as in close friends), by making a call or writing (or tweet, post, etc.) to each other from time to time.

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"Let’s keep in contact even though we’re parting."

An old three-word phrase lots of students write in school yearbooks all over America. Students originally thought that it seems nice to say "keep in touch," just because the majority of people separate off to different colleges after high school. Thus, people figured that it will be a nice little lasting word, just to be polite, and stay friends, and not be forgotten. But thanks to a little invention in 2004 called Facebook, there seems to be an excuse for those people with a "keep in touch" in their yearbook, to actually keep in touch. This is commonly referred to as the Keep In Touch Paradox, by students years later. Some girls may have written the abbreviation in the yearbook as K.I.T., which is just a fast way to write keep in touch. That would be like saying thanx instead of thank you.

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  • The meaning of "keep in touch" is: (idiom) let’s keep in contact even though we’re parting. – Janice Jun 20 '15 at 11:21
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Strictly speaking, no - there really isn't a difference between them. It's possible that "stay in touch" is a little more insistant and sincere than saying "keep in touch", which is kind of a casual and reflexive remark (like saying "see you later" when you have no idea when or if you'll ever see that person again). If somebody told me "stay in touch" I'd feel a lot more obliged to do so since it would seem like they actually cared. A lot of it has to do with the intonation of the phrase at any rate.

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Keep in touch is a phrase, in touch, means in or into contact that usually use “stay posting information to each other. For close friends, we usually take it as “stay in touch”.

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  • Since the "advertising" link has been removed, I see no good reason why this answer should be so severely downvoted. But given the poor quality of the English it wasn't much of an advert in the first place. Perhaps someone would like to rephrase it more naturally. – FumbleFingers May 17 '14 at 20:30

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