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Is there any synonym of the phrase "to fill in the gaps"? The context is "to bring new information".

I mean not in the situation when one is studying and fills in one's gaps of knowledge, but just the contrary, for example, when a person writes a book on a subject to bring some new information that fills in the gaps of the knowledge on that subject for others.

  • This new publication provides a comprehensive treatment of (topic). – aparente001 Feb 22 '18 at 4:35
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Tell me if the idiom to keep abreast of something fits your requirements. Here's how the Free Dictionary defines it:

To remain closely informed about something; to follow the developments of something or some situation.

Examples:

As a news correspondent for the region, it's my job to keep abreast of any changes in the political landscape here.

The boss likes to keep abreast of all our projects, even down to the most mundane detail.

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    Or "keep up to date on ..." related to having the newest information. – Andrew Feb 22 '18 at 2:59
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"To fill in the gaps" means that you have some level knowledge of a subject, but are being asked to complete it, or more fully understand it. It brings to my mind a picture of a bookshelf that has a number of books that belong in a collection, but there are gaps in the number sequence of those books and you want to "fill in those gaps" that exist on this bookshelf with the appropriate volumes to help complete the collection.

Filling in the gaps here means a bit more than bringing new information. Phrases that could be made to work would be "to enhance one's knowledge in this area" or "to further research".

You have been studying Engineering for some time now, but you seem to be lacking a bit in [Insert area of study]. For your next performance review, I want you to fill in the gaps this area so that it is not an issue going forward.

could become:

You have been studying Engineering for some time now, but you seem to be lacking a bit in [Insert area of study]. For your next performance review, I want you to conduct further research in this area so that is not an issue going forward.

or

You have been studying Engineering for some time now, but you seem to be lacking a bit in [Insert area of study]. For your next performance review, I want you to engage in further training here so that is not an issue going forward.

You see, depending on context, "fill in the gaps" can mean knowledge, ability, or any number of things. It is a very flexible phrase.

  • Yes, it's very flexible and applicable in many contexts. But I mean not in the situation when one is studying and fills in one's gaps of knowledge, but just the contrary, for example, when a person writes a book on a subject to bring some new information that fills in the gaps of the knowledge on that subject for others. Is there any equivalent? – RusLand Feb 22 '18 at 0:11

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