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Pile them in the frozen-food cabinets with the juice, and there was breakfast ready, oven-fresh, from the east coast to the west.

I am confused about the bold part from an article which talks about bagels, since "breakfast ready", "oven fresh" are adjectives and no object is found here.

Is the object omitted in the sentence (which sounds a little bit weird to me as a non-native speaker)? Are there any guidelines teaching English learners writing sentence like one?

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Pile them in the frozen-food cabinets with the juice, and there was breakfast ready, oven-fresh, from the east coast to the west.

There is no omitted noun. What you have is the noun breakfast with post-modifiers. That is, the adjectives *ready” and “oven-fresh” modify breakfast.

breakfast ready, oven-fresh

is equivalent to

ready, oven-fresh breakfast

It’s clear that breakfast here consists of both juice and them (bagels), so the adjectives modify breakfast not a proposed omitted bagels.

Still, the sentence is awkward and awkwardly punctuated. It’s possible the writer constructed the sentence so that the near-rhyming words freah and west each ended a phrase.

  • 1
    Just a heads up that I've updated the wording of the question a little bit. – ColleenV Feb 28 '18 at 19:32

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