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"The music interleaves multiple themes and variations, { some simultaneous, some sequential }"

(source: Emotional Design: Why We Love (or Hate) Everyday Things By Don Norman)

Is the phrase in the curly brackets a participial construction or an apposition? Could you help me to clarify it? Thank you always.

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    Because of some, some simultaneous, some sequential is not merely a case of nominal apposition; rather it is a kind of predicate about "themes and variations" but one lacking an explicit verb. You could paraphrase it: "some of these themes and variations are simultaneous and some are sequential". – Tᴚoɯɐuo Mar 3 '18 at 23:52
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    Appositives are one type of parenthesis. Another is the free modifier. I think your example fits the latter, with the quantifiers allowed because the modified items are plural. – amI Apr 24 '18 at 16:23
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They can't be participial phrases.  There are no participles present.  As I parse them, they are absolute phrases. 

An absolute phrase is a supplemental noun phrase with a postpositive modifier.  Strictly speaking, there is no noun in either of these phrases.  Instead, each phrase has the word "some".  Depending on your framework, you might label these as pronouns or as substantive adjectives.  Regardless of label, they play the same role that a noun typically plays.  The words "simultaneous" and "sequential" are also adjectives, here taking their ordinary attributive role even though they follow the words that they modify. 

The two phrases are coordinated asyndetically, which means that there is no conjunction marking the coordination.  Either "some simultaneous and some sequential" or "some simultaneous but some sequential" could serve the same purpose. 

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It's not an apposition, because the two phrases refer to two different things. For example, "The living room, the largest room in the house, has windows facing west," is an apposition because "The living room" and "the largest room in the house" refer to the same thing.

It's not a participial construction, because those are things with "ing". For example, "Expecting it to rain, I brought my umbrella." "Expecting it to rain" is a participial construction. Participial constructions contrast with gerunds, "Expecting it to rain convinced me to bring my umbrella."

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As Tᴚoɯɐuo says:

Because of some, some simultaneous, some sequential is not merely a case of nominal apposition; rather it is a kind of predicate about "themes and variations" but one lacking an explicit verb. You could paraphrase it: "some of these themes and variations are simultaneous and some are sequential"

To paraphrase: It's not an apposition but rather expands on what kinds of "themes and variations" are represented. Because it lacks the verb, I don't know if it would be classified as a participle phrase or as something else.

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