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What is the difference between following sentences:

This is venerable rather magnificent institution.

and

This is venerable and rather magnificent institution.

Also, can I use rather in this way: "this is auspicious rather felicitous occasion".

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    Three suggestions: (1) In these sentences, include "and" before "rather". (2) All three sentences should have an indefinite article after "is". (3) Reconsider whether you really want to say or write these sentences; they sound to me like what one hears in speeches by politicians who must give a speech but have nothing to say. – Andreas Blass Mar 3 '18 at 2:40
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    None of your three sentences is good English. – Xanne Mar 3 '18 at 3:35
  • @AndreasBlass Can't I use it as beginning of my speech. I was thinking to start my speech with admiration of an institution or an occasion. – mayankmax80 Mar 3 '18 at 8:17
  • If, after considering my comment, you still want to use one of these sentences, then you certainly can; no one will stop you. – Andreas Blass Mar 3 '18 at 13:04
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  1. The institution is a rather magnificent and venerable institution. "to a certain or significant extent of the "
  2. The institution is a magnificent institution rather than a venerable institution. "indicates your preference of adjective " Careful of the use of "This" as a pronoun. Separating it too far from the noun it replaces (the antecedent) can make it ambiguous. https://webapps.towson.edu/ows/proref.htm

  3. This is auspicious rather felicitous occasion. (This the pronoun has no antecedent so how do we know if this means occasion?) This occasion is a rather auspicious and felicitous one. ("One" is the indefinite pronoun and "this occasion" is the antecedent) This occasion is an auspicious occasion rather than a felicitous occasion. Not sure if that is what you meant in the sentences their meaning was not clear but maybe that will help.

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What the two sentences have in common is that neither is correct usage. In both cases, a definite article is needed after the verb.

Accounting for this, the first sentence needs a comma after "venerable", which will effectively behave as an "and".

This is a venerable, rather magnificent institution.

This is a venerable and rather magnificent institution.

As for the difference in usage, there is little difference. I would expect the first to be spoken in a more personal, affectionate tone of voice than the second.

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