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I had been struggling with my new year's resolutions and then I found a solution. The opening question I would like to ask my audience is "Have you been struggling with your new year's resolutions like I had been?". However, the last words "... like I had been" sound a bit awkward.

Can I say "Have you been struggling with your new year's resolutions like I did?" Will it lose the meaning I try to convey?

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Using past perfect is better since it unambiguously means you are no longer struggling

Have you been struggling with your new year's resolutions like I had been?
I was struggling before, are you still struggling?

or be more consistent with verb usage

Are you struggling with your new year's resolutions like I did?

The first leave the door open that the listener may not be struggling now or possibly struggling on and off, the second means they are still constantly struggling.

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