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"I have been waiting for your reply.You don't reply, tho. "

I do not understand the above sentence and the usage of "though".

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You need to refer to the previous sentence, and the meaning of though in this case most likely is:

despite this:

  • We went to high school together. I haven't seen her for years, though.

(Cambridge Dictionary)

  • At the end of the sentence though does not mean despite this. – Lambie Mar 5 '18 at 19:51
  • It is not the most likely meaning at all. If it were, you would be able to substitute despite this other than awkwardly in that sentence. – Lambie Mar 5 '18 at 20:08
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"I have been waiting for your reply.You don't reply, though. " means:

"I have been waiting for your reply. But you don't reply."

Though is used to mean but in spoken language. It can be placed at the beginning or at the end of the sentence when used like this.

More examples: I called him at five. He didn't answer the phone, though.

They came over in the afternoon. They did not enjoy themselves, though.

Though there means but, not despite.

Despite is:

Though he worked hard, he had no success.= Despite working hard, he had no success.

EDIT: The Cambridge Dictionary example meaning but can be transformed placing the though at the end where it continues to mean but

We didn’t make any profit though nobody knows why.= We didn't make any profit. Nobody knows why, though.

And my example: I have been waiting for your reply.You don't reply, though.= I have been waiting for your reply but you don't reply.

So, the but meaning requires though in the middle as the dictionary states or you need two sentences with though at the end of the second sentence.

  • Excuse me, but in your sentence "I have been waiting for your reply.You don't reply, though. " means “despite the fact that Ive been waiting for your reply , you don’t reply”...or nor? – user070221 Mar 5 '18 at 19:53
  • OK: I called him at five. He didn't answer the phone, though. They came over in the afternoon. They did not enjoy themselves, though. That is not despite. It is but. Despite is: Though I worked hard, I had no success. Despite working hard, I had no success. – Lambie Mar 5 '18 at 20:06
  • Hi @Lambie. I want to ask something if possible. When the "though" is used like "but", does it have to be at some place in the sentence? Because Cambrdige says: "When the although/though clause comes after a main clause, it can also mean ‘but' ". And in the examples of the dictionary, "though" is always placed in the middle of two clause. (dictionary.cambridge.org/tr/dilbilgisi/ingiliz-dilbilgisi/…). But as your examples show, "though" can be at the end of the other clause. – Talha Özden Jun 24 at 8:48
  • @TalhaÖzden See my edit. Notice: two sentences with though at the end of the second one. – Lambie Jun 24 at 15:09
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    @TalhaÖzden Though he likes her, he will not call her. [though: other usage, written, meaning despite]. BUT: "Though I wouldn't be surprised if there is some regional variation with this." is a verbal response to someone else. In those cases, the though can go at the beginning or the end. "I wouldn't be surprised if there is some regional variation with this, though." – Lambie Jul 21 at 21:57

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