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"I have been waiting for your reply.You don't reply, tho. "

I do not understand the above sentence and the usage of "though".

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You need to refer to the previous sentence, and the meaning of though in this case most likely is:

despite this:

  • We went to high school together. I haven't seen her for years, though.

(Cambridge Dictionary)

  • At the end of the sentence though does not mean despite this. – Lambie Mar 5 '18 at 19:51
  • It is not the most likely meaning at all. If it were, you would be able to substitute despite this other than awkwardly in that sentence. – Lambie Mar 5 '18 at 20:08
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"I have been waiting for your reply.You don't reply, though. " means:

"I have been waiting for your reply. But you don't reply."

Though is used to mean but in spoken language. It can be placed at the beginning or at the end of the sentence when used like this.

More examples: I called him at five. He didn't answer the phone, though.

They came over in the afternoon. They did not enjoy themselves, though.

Though there means but, not despite.

Despite is:

Though he worked hard, he had no success.= Despite working hard, he had no success.

  • Excuse me, but in your sentence "I have been waiting for your reply.You don't reply, though. " means “despite the fact that Ive been waiting for your reply , you don’t reply”...or nor? – user070221 Mar 5 '18 at 19:53
  • OK: I called him at five. He didn't answer the phone, though. They came over in the afternoon. They did not enjoy themselves, though. That is not despite. It is but. Despite is: Though I worked hard, I had no success. Despite working hard, I had no success. – Lambie Mar 5 '18 at 20:06

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