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Which order is more correct in English, an adverbial of place following the adverbial of time or the other way around?

For example, which one of the two sentences below would sound more natural in English?

Maggie is a very easy-going person. She has already been able to make friends with 10 students in her new class over this week.

Maggie is a very easy-going person. She has already been able to make friends with 10 students over this week in her new class.

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    I don't know any rule about adverbs of place before or after adverbs of time. It seems to me that sometimes a change of order might produce a change of meaning. For example, would the order "in her class this week" emphasize that they were in her class this week? Would "this week in her class" suggest that they were in class when they became friends? I think that in fact both of your examples mean the same thing to me and seem equally correct, but perhaps ambiguity would sometimes recommend one order over another order. – Chaim Mar 9 '18 at 14:19
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Either example is correct and they have the same meaning, I think the only difference is that the first clause has a little more emphasis so it just depends on which of these (length of week or size of class) you want to stress.

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